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Projects

ETA

Evaluation to Action

What we Know

Aboriginal children experience many health inequities. However, they are resilient. Today, there is a lack of wholistic data on local children's health to inform health program and services planning.

What is ETA?

ETA is a collaborative Indigenous children's health research project focused on an evaluation model and its impact when tailored to Indigenous communities in the province of Ontario.

ETA : Project details

The ETA project uses a Two-Eyed Seeing approach and consists of three strands. The three strands represent those of a sweetgrass braid, which will be woven together in analysis of shared learnings. *read more*

Our Journey and Benefits

The ETA Team believes that the journey is just as important as the destination. Learn more about the journey of the ETA project and the benefits for partner communities and academics

Applied Health Research Questions

The ETA Team receives funding from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care to address Applied Health Research Question (AHRQs) submitted by Aboriginal communities across Ontario. *read more*

Knowledge Exchange & Resources

The ETA Team has relished every opportunity to share our work with researchers, academics, and communities in Ontario. Visit our database of knowledge exchange materials to learn more. [Click Here](https://achwm.myshopify.com/pages/eta-what-is-eta) for more information.

Knowledge Exchange & Resources

The ETA Team has relished every opportunity to share our work with researchers, academics, and communities in Ontario. Visit our database of knowledge exchange materials to learn more. [Click Here](https://achwm.myshopify.com/pages/eta-what-is-eta) for more information.

Cundill

Purpose

To examine the role of the Aboriginal Children’s Health and Well-being Measure (ACHWM) in: Enhancing the identification of childhood depression; and Supporting the local referral and treatment process The focus of the Cundill Project is community-based health promotion with and for First Nations children and youth (aged 8-18) who live on-reserve. Funded by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), the project is rooted in a collaborative partnership between Laurentian University and the Naandwechige-Gamig Health Centre in Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory.

Scope

The Cundill Project was initiated when ACHWM survey questions were individually mapped onto 8 measures of depression and guidelines for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder. These questions were then reviewed by professionals in the mental health field, who worked to narrow the number of questions to those that most closely address symptoms of depression specific to Indigenous children. We are currently working on Mapping Pathways to Mental Health Services for Indigenous Children and Youth (aged 8-18) within their communities and are striving to build meaningful relationships with communities in urban, rural, and remote locations.

Scope

The Cundill Project was initiated when ACHWM survey questions were individually mapped onto 8 measures of depression and guidelines for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder. These questions were then reviewed by professionals in the mental health field, who worked to narrow the number of questions to those that most closely address symptoms of depression specific to Indigenous children. We are currently working on Mapping Pathways to Mental Health Services for Indigenous Children and Youth (aged 8-18) within their communities and are striving to build meaningful relationships with communities in urban, rural, and remote locations.

SPOR

Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research

What we Know

Health services on-reserve have the capacity to deliver health promotion, prevention, early intervention, and counselling, [12] yet many youth present to mental health clinics at medium to high risk of mental health crisis. Thus, there is an inherent mismatch between the mental health needs of First Nations youth and the scope and capacity of services on-reserve. Since intensive or specialist-based treatment is not available on-reserve, youth are forced to leave their communities to seek treatment hundreds of kilometers from home, away from family support. To achieve better fit and improve outcomes, we must identify youth earlier – when their mental health needs are emergent rather than urgent. A multi-faceted approach is necessary, to support youth in crisis while turning some attention upstream, to population health promotion and secondary prevention.

Project Details

Focusing on prevention. our goal is to evaluate the impact of a new screening and triage process to identify and support youth earlier in their illness trajectory. It also supports Canada’s National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy, to “develop and carry out locally-driven community plans for preventing suicide in First Nations and Inuit communities”, [13] and is in line with the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion’s recommendation to focus upstream on population-based health promotion. [14] Prevention strategies are critical in isolated communities and school-based screening is a recommended best-practice for harm reduction. [15, 16] Secondary prevention is most effective in high risk populations and is effective for youth. [17, 18] The Ontario government took action by funding 80 new Child and Youth Mental Health and Addictions Workers to support First Nations youth in 2014. However, there is no process in place to identify at-risk youth on-reserve that is efficient, culturally appropriate, and feasible in isolated First Nations with limited resources.

Project Details

Focusing on prevention. our goal is to evaluate the impact of a new screening and triage process to identify and support youth earlier in their illness trajectory. It also supports Canada’s National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy, to “develop and carry out locally-driven community plans for preventing suicide in First Nations and Inuit communities”, [13] and is in line with the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion’s recommendation to focus upstream on population-based health promotion. [14] Prevention strategies are critical in isolated communities and school-based screening is a recommended best-practice for harm reduction. [15, 16] Secondary prevention is most effective in high risk populations and is effective for youth. [17, 18] The Ontario government took action by funding 80 new Child and Youth Mental Health and Addictions Workers to support First Nations youth in 2014. However, there is no process in place to identify at-risk youth on-reserve that is efficient, culturally appropriate, and feasible in isolated First Nations with limited resources.

Framework

We are guided by the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework, [19] shown in Appendix Figure 2. The Framework articulates essential services, beginning with “Health Promotion, Prevention, Community Development, and Education” and “Early Identification and Intervention”. [19] The social determinants of health (SDOH) [20-22] also play a pivotal role. Our intervention impacts intermediate determinants [23] by enhancing the social safety net and health services system.

VIEW

Valuing Indigenous Emotional Wellness

Overview

The Valuing Indigenous Emotional Wellness (VIEW) project’s goal is to identify programs, strategies, and resources that support mental wellness for children and youth in Indigenous communities. This project aims to be a starting point to facilitate knowledge exchange and sharing across communities and nations.

Background

VIEW is the result of a Rapid-Response Knowledge Synthesis Grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic is causing significant impacts on mental wellness. Indigenous children are uniquely vulnerable to emotional and mental health issues. They will be heavily impacted by COVID-19 restrictions, as well as lacking access to health supports that most Canadians take for granted. VIEW aims to promote children's emotional wellness in geographically isolated communities, both during and following the COVID-19 pandemic.

Background

VIEW is the result of a Rapid-Response Knowledge Synthesis Grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic is causing significant impacts on mental wellness. Indigenous children are uniquely vulnerable to emotional and mental health issues. They will be heavily impacted by COVID-19 restrictions, as well as lacking access to health supports that most Canadians take for granted. VIEW aims to promote children's emotional wellness in geographically isolated communities, both during and following the COVID-19 pandemic.

How to Access VIEW

VIEW resources can be accessed on the ACHWM member portal by creating a member account and clicking on the VIEW Hub. The VIEW Hub contains mental wellness programs and mental wellness resources. The programs consist of a compendium of existing programs, evaluated for their effectiveness in supporting Indigenous children and youth. Resources include a list of existing public, existing community, and new resources that address mental health literacy and stigma.