ACHWM

Welcome to the home of Aaniish Naa Gegii:

the Children's Health and Well-being Measure

COVID-19 Updates: During these unprecedented times, we continue to be available to assist communities online and remotely. For updates and resources, visit our [COVID-19 page.](/Covid-19/updates)

How Are You?

Hello and welcome to the ACHWM website, the video bellow illustrates our journey from the creation of the ACHWM to its use today.

What is the Aaniish Naa Gegii?

The ACHWM © is a measure of health and well-being for Indigenous children in Canada. It was previously known as the Aboriginal Children's Health and Well-being Measure. The ACHWM can be used with First Nation, Inuit and Métis children ages 8 to 18 years. The children, who can chose to read the questions or listen to them, complete the measure itself on a tablet. The tablet app automatically calculates overall score as well as quadrant scores for spiritual, emotional, physical and mental well being. The process helps connect children to additional supports if needed along with providing communities with local data. This can help to track health outcomes, guide health programming, evaluate programs and empower local health leaders by providing evidence to advocate for services to meet children’s health needs. Completed on a tablet by children reading or hearing the questions. The ACHWM is available to Indigenous communities and Indigenous agencies for use within your community, by your community and for your community.

How do you say “How are you”?

We say "ëdlanët’ë".

Dene

What the Children say:

I liked the survey, the actual typing and touching on the tablet. I liked how it asked questions about being active.
It was fun to do.
I liked that it was on a tablet. That was neat. It was really simple to do.
I liked it because it was on a tablet.
It helped me to think about me.
It was nice and centered.

How do you say "How are you"?

We say "Aaniish Naa Gegii"!

Anishnaabemowin, North Eastern Ontario dialect

Why is the Aaniish Naa Gegii Important ?

Children and youth comprise 40% of the Canadian Indigenous population. These young people face significant health inequities compared to their peers, especially those living on-reserve. Data on health and well-being is needed to guide community policies, health services planning and evaluation, that supports Indigenous communities on their path to health and well-being. This evidence to promote better health outcomes is lacking. Part of the reason is the shortage of outcome measures that are appropriate for use with First Nation, Métis and Inuit children and youth. It is important to have self-report measures that are both culturally relevant to original Canadians while meeting the requirements of scientific rigor. The ACHWM is proposed as one mechanism to bridge this gap, inform and support action. Data on health and well-being is needed to guide community policies, health services planning and evaluation, that supports Indigenous communities on their path to health and well-being.

What is unique about the Aaniish Naa Gegii?

It was developed from the perspective of First Nations children in Wiikwemkoong. It is completed by children (self-report) using computer tablets – the tablet can talk to children when desired. It has been assessed by other communities (i.e., with First Nations, Métis and Inuit children) and good fit has been achieved. It has also been established to ensure relevance to other communities. This initiative: - Has been endorsed by the Chiefs of Ontario (Resolution 13/15) and is supported by the Anishinabek Nation Grand Council Chief. - Gives children a voice in their own health assessment. - Was developed with Indigenous children. - Is culturally relevant and grounded in the Medicine Wheel. The measure provides overall score; physical, emotional, mental and spiritual health scores. - Is scientifically sound, valid, reliable and sensitive tablets engage children in a non-judgemental way. - Uses an automated process enhances feasibility and supports the generation of local report. Tablets are able to quickly identify urgent health needs and facilitate new connections to local supports. - Can generates quantifiable data useful at the local level to support program planning / evaluation and funding requests. [Learn more about the development and validation of the ACHWM](/research/articles)

Indigenous children's health is about...

Language

Indigenous children's health is about...

Choosing the right path

Indigenous children's health is about...

Balance

Indigenous children's health is about...

Culturally appropriate tools and practices

Indigenous children's health is about...

Giving a voice to Indigenous children and youth

Indigenous children's health is about...

Giving a voice to Indigenous children and youth