Explore the

Parent and Guardian Hub

to learn how ACHWM can support your child.

What is the ACHWM?

ACHWM Explained to Parents, Guardians and Caregivers

Was your child asked to take the ACHWM? If you want to learn how the ACHWM was created and how it will benefit your child and family, check out this video! Click here to view [ACHWM Explained to Parents, Guardians and Caregivers video](https://drive.google.com/file/d/1tFlGHwMJqZwNvo-dB80Zmfr6fQ1my9xb/view)

ACHWM Explained to Parents, Guardians and Caregivers

Was your child asked to take the ACHWM? If you want to learn how the ACHWM was created and how it will benefit your child and family, check out this video! Click here to view [ACHWM Explained to Parents, Guardians and Caregivers video](https://drive.google.com/file/d/1tFlGHwMJqZwNvo-dB80Zmfr6fQ1my9xb/view)

Consent and Information

Each community determines their own protocols for parent or guardian and child consent before completing the ACHWM. Similarly, each community will use data for different purposes. Your child's safety and confidentiality are of the utmost importance.

Reach out to your local community organization that is implementing the ACHWM to learn more about their unique processes.

Consent and Information

Each community determines their own protocols for parent or guardian and child consent before completing the ACHWM. Similarly, each community will use data for different purposes. Your child's safety and confidentiality are of the utmost importance.

Reach out to your local community organization that is implementing the ACHWM to learn more about their unique processes.

Support Resources

Mental Health Supports for Children and Youth

The following resources are confidential, anonymous supports available 24/7 that have been designed for First Nation, Inuit, and Metis children and youth.
[Hope for Wellness](https://www.hopeforwellness.ca) has an online chat or you can call 1-855-242-3310.
[LGBT Youthline](https://www.youthline.ca/) has an online chat for 2SLGBTTQQIA peer support, or you can call 647-694-4275.
[Kids Help Phone](https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/first-nations-inuit-and-metis/?utm_medium=vanity&utm_source=kidshelpphone.ca/indigenous&utm_campaign=IndigenousYouthInitiatives) lets you text, live chat, or call someone at 1-800-668-6868.
A more complete list of Support Services can be found in the Resource Hub, located in the [ACHWM Member Portal](https://www.achwm.ca/login).

Mental Health Supports for Children and Youth

The following resources are confidential, anonymous supports available 24/7 that have been designed for First Nation, Inuit, and Metis children and youth.
[Hope for Wellness](https://www.hopeforwellness.ca) has an online chat or you can call 1-855-242-3310.
[LGBT Youthline](https://www.youthline.ca/) has an online chat for 2SLGBTTQQIA peer support, or you can call 647-694-4275.
[Kids Help Phone](https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/first-nations-inuit-and-metis/?utm_medium=vanity&utm_source=kidshelpphone.ca/indigenous&utm_campaign=IndigenousYouthInitiatives) lets you text, live chat, or call someone at 1-800-668-6868.
A more complete list of Support Services can be found in the Resource Hub, located in the [ACHWM Member Portal](https://www.achwm.ca/login).

Mental Health Supports for Adults

The following resources are designed for First Nation, Inuit, and Metis peoples of all ages.
[Hope for Wellness](https://www.hopeforwellness.ca) supports all Indigenous peoples and has an online chat or you can call 1-855-242-3310.
[National Indian Residential School Crisis Line](http://www.iap-pei.ca/pub-eng.php?act=factsheets/health-support-eng.php) provides mental health, emotional and cultural support services to eligibile former Indian Residential School students and their families throughout all phases of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement. Call 1-866-925-4419
[Talk4Healing]( http://www.talk4healing.com) is culturally-grounded, fully confidential helpline for Indigenous women available in 14 languages all across Ontario. Call 1-855-554-HEAL
[Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Support Lines](https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1448633299414/1534526479029#:~:text=For%20immediate%20emotional%20assistance%2C%20call,murdered%20Indigenous%20women%20and%20girls) offers support at 1-844-413-6649.

Mental Health Supports for Adults

The following resources are designed for First Nation, Inuit, and Metis peoples of all ages.
[Hope for Wellness](https://www.hopeforwellness.ca) supports all Indigenous peoples and has an online chat or you can call 1-855-242-3310.
[National Indian Residential School Crisis Line](http://www.iap-pei.ca/pub-eng.php?act=factsheets/health-support-eng.php) provides mental health, emotional and cultural support services to eligibile former Indian Residential School students and their families throughout all phases of the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement. Call 1-866-925-4419
[Talk4Healing]( http://www.talk4healing.com) is culturally-grounded, fully confidential helpline for Indigenous women available in 14 languages all across Ontario. Call 1-855-554-HEAL
[Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Support Lines](https://www.rcaanc-cirnac.gc.ca/eng/1448633299414/1534526479029#:~:text=For%20immediate%20emotional%20assistance%2C%20call,murdered%20Indigenous%20women%20and%20girls) offers support at 1-844-413-6649.

Additional Resources for Parents and Guardians

First Nations and Métis Parenting Booklets

The [National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health](https://www.nccih.ca/en/) has shared four updated resources for First Nations and Métis parents and caregivers in British Columbia. Topics include "Growing Up Healthy", "Family Connections", "Parents as First Teachers", and "Fatherhood is Forever".

[Access these resources here.](https://www.nccih.ca/573/Launch_of_the_BC_First_Nations_and_M%C3%A9tis_Parenting_Booklets.nccah)

First Nations and Métis Parenting Booklets

The [National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health](https://www.nccih.ca/en/) has shared four updated resources for First Nations and Métis parents and caregivers in British Columbia. Topics include "Growing Up Healthy", "Family Connections", "Parents as First Teachers", and "Fatherhood is Forever".

[Access these resources here.](https://www.nccih.ca/573/Launch_of_the_BC_First_Nations_and_M%C3%A9tis_Parenting_Booklets.nccah)

Kids Help Phone "Resources Around Me"

Find a youth program near you with Kids Help Phone's interactive map. Select "Indigenous Support Services" in the topic drop down menu to view youth supports in your local area.

[Kids Help Phone - Resources Around Me](https://apps.kidshelpphone.ca/resourcesaroundme/welcome.html)

Kids Help Phone "Resources Around Me"

Find a youth program near you with Kids Help Phone's interactive map. Select "Indigenous Support Services" in the topic drop down menu to view youth supports in your local area.

[Kids Help Phone - Resources Around Me](https://apps.kidshelpphone.ca/resourcesaroundme/welcome.html)

Talking to your Child about Emotional and Mental Health

Discussing mental and emotional health with your child can be difficult, but it is important for their health and well-being.

Swipe through to read some tips on having conversations about mental and emotional health.

Discuss emotional health early and often

Create frequent, regular opportunities for discussion about mental and emotional health at neutral times, such as when you are going for a drive, taking a walk, or doing something your child likes to do. Ask open-ended questions that gives your child room to express themselves. Watch your child’s reactions and acknowledge if they seem hurt or uncomfortable.

Listen, respect, and validate their feelings

It’s OK for children and youth to feel sad or angry. Our instinct is usually to reassure the child, but that can minimize their experiences. Encourage them to talk about how they feel, ask questions, and acknowledge their suffering by saying, “that sounds terrible”. If your child does not feel comfortable talking to you, don’t take it personally – help you child find someone they do feel comfortable talking to who you both trust, like a family member or Elder.

Help develop their self-esteem and strengths

Individual strengths are important tools to building the confidence and tools to overcome obstacles. Help your child develop a health self-esteem by asking questions about their activities and interests and showing lots of love and acceptance. Recognize both their efforts as well as what they achieve.

Problem solve together

Problem solving with your child ensures they have the tools to succeed. Practice self-soothing, calming, and relaxing techniques together during neutral times; this could include deep breathing, building safe spaces, doing something calming (such as a quiet activity they enjoy), or going for a walk. Discuss potentially difficult situations and brainstorm how they could overcome them. When obstacles come up, talk about possible solutions or ideas to improve the situation. Let the child lead the problem solving.

Problem solve together

Problem solving with your child ensures they have the tools to succeed. Practice self-soothing, calming, and relaxing techniques together during neutral times; this could include deep breathing, building safe spaces, doing something calming (such as a quiet activity they enjoy), or going for a walk. Discuss potentially difficult situations and brainstorm how they could overcome them. When obstacles come up, talk about possible solutions or ideas to improve the situation. Let the child lead the problem solving.

Ask for help

Local community resources are available to support you and your child. Talk to an Elder, someone who practices Traditional Healing, a medical professional, or a local mental health worker about what supports are available in your community. Accessing resources early can help your child build tools and resources they may need later on. If your child is suicidal, seek assistance as soon as possible. During a suicidal crisis, that often means heading immediately to the emergency room.